GUEST BLOG – What’s Wrong With Oil by Sarah Taylor

I met Sarah Taylor at the Healthy Lifestyle Expo when we were introduced by a mutual friend.  Sarah is one busy vegan lady!  In 2002, she went vegan overnight after reading a copy of John Robbin’s book, Diet for a New America.  Four years later she wrote Vegan in 30 Days as a practical approach and step-by-step plan for helping others to become vegan (It has since been published around the world in several languages).

Sarah holds Certification in Plant Based Nutrition from Cornell University, and is currently working on her next vegan book, called Vegetarian to Vegan, which will be available next year. She is on faculty at the Nutritional Education Institute, and has worked as the Motivational Trainer for Joel Fuhrman, MD, author of Eat to Live.  Sarah has been interviewed for numerous radio and internet shows, including NPR, PBS and EarthSave Radio, among others.  She is an “Expert” blogger at VegSource and also runs her own weekly blog (click HERE).

After I went to the Healthy Lifestyle Expo I mentioned to you all that I was now convinced oil is not healthy.  Sarah does a fantastic job of explaining why in today’s Guest Blog post.  I sincerely hope you take the message to heart because doing so could prevent you from ever having to suffer a cardiac event.

WHAT’S WRONG WITH OIL

by Sarah Taylor

We have been taught that oil – especially olive and canola oils – are heart healthy.  They are good for us, and we should swap out butter and margarine and cook with these heart healthy oils instead.   However, I believe that nothing could be further from the truth.

The heart healthy rumor about oil came from the study that coined the “Mediterranean Diet”, The Lyon Diet Heart Study.  In this study, all 605 patients had survived one heart attack.  The patients in the treatment group were told to eat a “Mediterranean Diet,” high in fruits, vegetables, breads, beans, nuts, and seeds.  They were told to go light on dairy products, fish, poultry, meat, eggs, and wine.  They were also told to add in olive oil, for its monounsaturated fats.  The people in the control group were given no dietary advice, and ate a diet typical of most Westerners, particularly high in saturated fat.

The study had very good results:  The people on the Mediterranean diet were 50-70% less likely to experience any kind of cardiac ailments.  Since olive oil was specifically recommended in this study for it’s monounsaturated fat content, this is where the belief that olive oil is healthy originated.

But what we don’t hear about the Lyon Diet Heart Study is this little factoid:  Fully 25% of the people on the Mediterranean diet had either died or experienced a new cardiac event during the four-year study.  That’s one in four people on the Mediterranean diet!

Compare this to Caldwell Esselstyn’s diet, which is vegan with no oil or other fats included.  The patients in this study had suffered from an average of about three cardiac events before the study started.  Of all of his patients that fully adhered to his diet, there was not one further cardiac event in twelve years.

If you want further proof, here’s another compelling study:  A group of students’ arteries were tested after eating a 900-calorie breakfast, to see the effects of fat on the blood vessels’ ability to dilate and contract.  Our blood vessels need to be able to expand and contract to regulate blood flow to the organs that need it most.  Half of the students had a fat free breakfast of 900 calories, and the other half had a fatty breakfast of 900 calories.  After breakfast, the student’s arteries were tested to see how quickly their arteries could bounce back after being restricted for five minutes.  The arteries of the group that had no fat in their breakfast bounced right back after being constricted for five minutes; but the arteries of the group that had the fatty breakfast took up to six hours to regain their ability to dilate and contract normally.  All oil, my friends, is 100% fat.  Even olive oil.

Heart disease is not really a disease of the heart; it’s a disease of the blood vessels that occurs when blood (and the oxygen it carries) cannot get to the heart because the vessels are blocked up and compromised.  When a blood vessel to the heart gets clogged up and closes, then the heart does not receive any blood, and a heart attack occurs.  Our vessels are probably the most important part of our overall health, and fat undoubtedly has a negative effect on our vessels – even “healthy” oils, because they are still 100% fat.  Therefore, many doctors, including Caldwell Esselstyn, recommend no oil in the diet.

I’ll finish with my personal experience with Dr. Esselstyn.  After being vegan for 4 or 5 years, I stood up at a conference and asked Dr. Esselstyn this question:  If I am 100% vegan and therefore not ingesting any cholesterol, why does my cholesterol remain so high at 230 mg/dL?  He challenged me to get the oil out of my diet.  He said that “eating fat causes the body to manufacture excessive amounts of cholesterol,” even if those fats come from plants.  I honestly didn’t believe him, but agreed to his challenge anyway.  My cholesterol had never been below 200 mg/dL, even when I first had it tested at 19.

After just one month on his oil-free vegan diet my cholesterol fell to 151 mg/dL, and my LDL was so low that it was imperceptible on the cholesterol test!  When I added oil back in to my diet, my total cholesterol jumped right back up over 200 mg/dL again, and my LDL to 120 mg/dL.  For me, this is personal proof that really hits home:  Oil is not healthy!

For more information about Sarah’s company click HERE. 

Olive oil image courtesy of eHow.com 

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7 Comments

Filed under Cholesterol, Education, Fat, Guest Blog, Heart Health, Vegan, Vegetarian

7 responses to “GUEST BLOG – What’s Wrong With Oil by Sarah Taylor

  1. Thanks – I agree and eat very little added oil. Howevel my HDL is 40 and when I meet with dieticians they always want me to consume more “healthy” oils to raise my HDL.
    I wonder is an HDL of 40 still bad on a plant based diet, or does it just indicate their isn’t much excess cholesterol to scavenge? My total cholesterol is 175 and LDL is 118 – good, but not quite perfect.

    • Mark…I have an answer for you with regards to total cholesterol, but it does not speak to HDL or LDL independently. Basically I was able to ask Dr. McDougall about this directly at a conference recently. I have plans on doing a post with his word for word transcription (I recorded it), but I just haven’t had a chance to do it yet. I have low cholesterol (135 total) and my primary care physician wants me to eat more cholesterol because she fears that my cholesterol is too low. Dr. McDougall told me that my cholesterol is great and not to worry. I will get to that post soon 🙂

  2. Very, very, interesting! I’m going to look into this in my own diet. 🙂

  3. All oils are 4,000 calories per pound, the most calorie rich nd nutrient poor food on the planet. People eat it because like salt and sugar, they beome addicted to it. Ioil has no fiber and no nutrients. You can get ll the healthy fats you need, and even raise your cholesterol by eating WHOLE FOOD FATS, like nuts, seeds, avocado and coconut, raw, nor their extracted oils. People believing that oil, agave or dairy is healthful is merely a triumph of marketing over science. Oil is inflammatory and contributes to obesity, diabetes and heart disease. There is never a benefit of eating a processed food over a whole food. It takes 16 ears of corn to make 1 tablespoon of corn oil. No one would ever set that much corn. I told you this stuff when you took my class a few months ago. I am glad you believe it now. My LDL is 57, we have been oil free for years.

    Love & Kale,
    Chef AJ
    http://Www.EatUnprocessed.com

  4. Dr. Pam Popper just posted a great response about oil in her “Healthy News You Can Use” Newsletter. To read her response click on http://www.wellnessforum.com/NewsStand/ and scroll down to the “Ask Dr. Pam” section.

  5. Pingback: Two Dogs and Spice» Blog Archive » Cooking Flops and Oil

  6. Pingback: CREAMY SMOKEY SPANISH DRESSING | VEGGIE GRETTIE

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